Chillin'Competition

Relaxing whilst doing Competition Law is not an Oxymoron

Reading Competition Law Books

with 4 comments

In our “Friday Slot” interviews we ask what competition law book deserves an Antitrust Oscar. A frequent reply from our interviewees is that they do not read competition law books but rather consult specific sections of such books when they are looking for something in particular.

We don’t necessarily agree with this view. Even though there are certainly some books that we only use for reference, we believe that some of the best books on antitrust are texts that you will not come accross if you’re just looking for references or for the answer to a very particular problem.

In our very own experience, reading certain competition law books written by people who clearly outsmart us has provided us good general overview of issues that we may not had/have yet seen in our professional life, and, most importantly, it has obliged us to reflect and think about what makes sense and what doesn’t in a discipline to which we devote an insane proportion of our life. Personally, we have learnt most of the theory we know from books and not from attending courses, seminars or conferences, no matter how good they were.

The obvious -and reasonable- response is “if, as you say, you already devote an insane amount of time to this, why on earth would you spend non-working time reading about the same subject?”. That’s partly true, but, the way we see it, it is one thing to spend your time working on a particular issue, and a very different one to take the time and distance (not to let the trees hide the woods) to reflect on the reasonableness of the overall discipline in which we are immersed.

We’re not saying that we do -nor, of course, that anyone else should- read competition law books instead of non-competition law books. No matter how good a competition law book is, non-competition law books teach you or open your mind to much more important stuff. We are just saying that -when we’ve had the time- we have found it useful to include some competition law books in our reading list.

A (certainly non-exhaustive) selection of some of the competition law books that make a most interesting read could feature Hovenkamp’s “The Antitrust Enterprise“; Areeda and Kaplow’s “Antitrust Analysis: Problems, Text, Cases“; Bork’s “The Antitrust Paradox“; Posner’s “Antitrust Law“; Amato’s “Antitrust and the Bounds of Power“; Luis Ortiz’s “Market Power in EU Antitrust Law“, Giorgio Monti’s “EC Competition Law” or Odudu’s “The Boundaries of EC Competition Law; The Scope of Article 81“. There are many other great books but we can’t name them all (suggestions in the form of comments will be welcome!).

The ones I’m currently in the (slow) process of reading (alternating from one to the other) are “Creation without Restraint: Promoting Liberty and Rivalry in Innovation” by C. Bohannan and H. Hovenkamp;  Kevin Coates’ “Competition Law and Regulation of Technology Markets” and Einer Elhauge’s (Ed), “Research Handbook on the Economics of Antitrust Law“. I´ll also be happy to read Nicolas’ most recent book ; sorry, wrong link; this is the right one!  ;) I intend to post a review of these books here once I´m done with them.

Regardless of all the above, my personal favourite antitrust book ever is one that I have only used for specific consultations and that I will most likely never read: the Treatise written by Areeda and Hovenkamp: “Antitrust Law: An Analysis of Antitrust Principles and their Application“. The reason why I know I won’t read it is that it looks like this:

Three additional comments:

- Herbert Hovenkamp -whose work is referenced above a few times- is clearly one of the 4 or 5 people from whom I’ve learnt more antitrust law, and the only one of these (aside from his co-author late Philip Areeda) whom I have never had the chance to meet in person (which again proves the importance of competition law books). We are very proud to anticipate that our next Friday Slot interview is with him!

- There is much to be said about the pricing of many of these books. But we’ll deal with that in a separate post.

- I recently recommended here a non-competition book -in Spanish, though- and a few (four) of you have sent emails saying that you loved it, which is nice to hear. Here is another suggestion, in English this time: A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genious.

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Written by Alfonso Lamadrid

2 May 2012 at 5:55 pm

4 Responses

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  1. Hi Alfonso,

    I agree with your article. I have learned much more about competition law from the books you mentioned than of cases, commentaries, etc. Tow of my favourites you did not menion are:

    D. J. Gerber, Law and Competition in Twentieth Century Europe: Protecting Prometheus, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998)
    R. J. Van den Bergh and P. D. Camesasca, European Competition Law and Economics: A Comparative Perspective, (London: Sweet and Maxwell, 2006)

    Pal Szilagyi

    2 May 2012 at 11:49 pm

  2. I loove Anos Lentos…

    Milana Bonita

    3 May 2012 at 12:30 pm

  3. Great post. As it always happens when you make lists (best books, movies, TV series, etc.) there is much to argue about it though.

    Hovenkamp and Gerber (not only “Protecting Prometheus” but also “Law, Markets, and Globalization”) are, for me, on top of any list!

    Fernando Cachafeiro

    3 May 2012 at 3:59 pm

  4. […] ago, today’s Friday Slot festures an interview with Herbert Hovenkamp.  We also said in our previous post that, even though we have never met Professor Hovenkamp in person, there are very few people […]


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