Chillin'Competition

Relaxing whilst doing Competition Law is not an Oxymoron

Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

On Competition Law and Technology + State aid

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As you know, Pablo and myself -and Nico too- are quite involved in a Course on EU & Spanish Competition Law Course that I co-direct in Madrid with Luis Ortiz Blanco. Aside from being a great pretext for me to go home once in a while, the fact is that we are getting increasingly better at bringing good competition law action to Spain.

The two upcoming seminars are very good examples:

– On Thursday and Friday this week (5 and 6 March) we will be holding a seminar on State Aid coordinated by José Luis Buendía and Jorge Piernas which could hardly be better. I truly don’t think there’s a better way to learn all you need to know about State aid in 48 hours. In that time a list of top-notch speakers will cover all the essentials of State aid law as well as the most recent hot topics. Speakers include (by order of appearance): Jose Luis Buendía (Garrigues & King’s College London), Jorge Piernas (University of Murcia), Leigh Hancher (University of Tilburg), Piet Jan Slot (University of Leiden), Juan Arpio (University of Zaragoza), Deborah Heredia (Spanish Ministry of Foreign Affairs), Carlos Urraca (European Commission Legal Service), Joaquín Fernandez (DG Competition, European Commission), Alejandro Requejo (Compass Lexecon), Miguel García Caba (Spanish Professional Football League), Ramón Terol (University of Alicante), Juan Pedro Marín (SEPI); Elisabetta Righini (King’s College London), José Manuel Panero (Garrigues) and Patricia Vidal (Uría Menéndez). More info is available here.

– And on 13 March, we will host a seminar on “Competition Law and Technology”.
The programme is the following:

12h –14h Competition, IP and technology

  • Introduction to the EU copyright regime and to its reform, Eleonora Rosati, Lecturer, University of Southampton
  • Copyright licensing and competition law – Pablo Ibañez Colomo, Associate Professor, LSE
  • Competition law and IPR exhaustion– Alvaro Ramos, Legal Director, Cisco Systems

16h- 18.30h  Competition law and distribution in the online world

  • An introduction to competition law and online distribution- Donald Slater, Partner, Ashurst
  • The economics of online distribution- Valérie Meunier, Vice-President, Compass Lexecon
  • Emerging challenges for competition law in online distribution – Miguel Pérez Guerra, Competition Counsel EMEA, Google
  • Emerging challenges for competition law in online distribution  – Robert Mahnke, Global Competition Counsel, eBay

18.30h – 20h Setting the online playing field

  • Competition law and online search- Thomas Graf, Partner, Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilston
  • The double duality of two-sided markets- Alfonso Lamadrid, Garrigues (yes, I’m repeating myself, but I have 3 Hearings in Luxembourg that week, and since I get to co-decide on the programme… ;) )
  • The fluctuation of substantive standards in high tech markets- Pablo Ibañez Colomo, Associate Professor, LSE

More info on this seminar (which will be conducted fully in English and under Chatham House Rules) is available here: Seminar Competition Law in the Technology Sector

Written by Alfonso Lamadrid

3 March 2015 at 8:41 pm

International Conference on Cartels- Materials

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The Universidad San Pablo CEU (which thanks to the work of Prof. Jerónimo Maillo has always paid an unusual attention to competition law) and the Spanish Competition Authority recently held an international workshop on Cartels in Madrid which I hear was a great success.

I couldn’t make it, but I’m told that my colleague Konstantin Jörgens did a great job discussing a piece I’ve co-written on the assessment of evidence in cartel cases.

All materials are now available at the website of USP-CEU’s Institute for European Studies , but since we know you’re a bit lazy (no offence) we’ll save you the effort of an additional click:

  • Opening Speech
    Eduardo Prieto
    Download pdf
  • Integrating Regulatory and Antitrust Powers
    Juan Delgado
    Download pdf
  • Calculating fines: Practical problems
    Alberto Escudero
    Download pdf
  • Lessons from the Damages’claims in the Spanish sugar cartel
    Francisco Marcos
    Download pdf
  • EU Antitrust Damages
    Evelyne Ameye
    Download pdf
  • European Commission’s settlement procedure – a success story
    Eric Van Ginderachter
    Download pdf
  • Leniency programmes and the problematic use of confidential information
    Javier Guillen
    Download pdf
  • An economic assessment of the judicial review of the CNMC’s fines
    Javier García-Verdugo
    Download pdf
  • Cartel Settlements
    Jean-François Bellis
    Download pdf
  • Leniency and Cartel Detection
    Juliane Schulze
    Download pdf
  • Sanctioning hard core cartel infringements in EU Competition Law: towards a more compliance-driven approach
    Aaron Khan
    Download pdf
  • Fines and Evidence in Cartels
    Konstantin Jörgens
    Download pdf
  • Prosecutorial & Non-Prosecutorial Systems and the Fight against Cartels
    Marianela Lopez-Galdos
    Download pdf
  • Leniency – Dutch experience
    Pablo Amador Sánchez
    Download pdf
  • ‘How (Not) to Design a Criminal Cartel Offence: Learning from the UK Experience’
    Peter Whelan
    Download pdf
  • Swedish Competition Authority
    Karin Montelius
    Download pdf
  • EU Judicial Architecture Facing Anti-Cartel Enforcement
    Georges Vallindas
    Download pdf
  • Leniency Plus: a Building Block or a Trojan Horse?
    Marek Martyniszyn
    Download pdf
  • Class Actions to Claim Antitrust Damages
    Pablo Gutiérrez de Cabiedes
    Download pdf

 

Written by Alfonso Lamadrid

18 December 2014 at 7:01 pm

More on Android

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On Wednesday I very much enjoyed participating in an interesting panel on the Android investigation with Kristina Nordlander, Trevor Soames and Neil Dryden. We hold different views about it (I’ve motivated my skepticism here before) but it’s always a pleasure to debate with smart lawyers.

Our presentations are available here:

Lamadrid_Android (thanks to Miguel Angel Bolsa for the help!)

K. Nordlander – Android and Google Play

Trevor Soames_Android (this one contains a few references to this blog)

In my next conference appearance (at the Swedish Competition Authority’s Pros and Cons conference on Two-sided markets on 28 November; see here for the program and registration info) I’ll be accompanied by another reputed and esteemed jurist who also happened to found this blog.

Written by Alfonso Lamadrid

17 October 2014 at 11:10 am

ERA’s workshop- Exclusionary Pricing under Art. 102 TFEU: Impact of Recent Case Law

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ERA (the Academy of European Law), with which we’ve collaborated a few times in the past, will be holding a competition workshop titled “Exclusionary Pricing under Art. 102 TFEU: Impact of Recent Case Law”.

It will feature our friend Damien Gerard (who, by the way, has succeeded Nicolas as Director of the Global Competition Law Centre), our first Friday Slotee Ian Forrester (he’s actually the one who proposed the Friday Slot name), and Manuel Kellerbauer, from the Commission’s Legal Service.

Judging by the absurdly high number of click-troughs to Wouter Wils’ now famous piece on Intel and the effects based approach that we’ve seen on this blog in the past couple of days, we guess that this event might be of interest to many of you…

For more info, click here.

 

P.S. The fact that this posts gets me a free pass for one of our most recent hires (Sam Villiers, you’re welcome)  is merely incidental ;)

Written by Alfonso Lamadrid

24 September 2014 at 5:51 pm

Upcoming events

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Platforms like this blog are supposed to be 2-sided markets where the service is provided to users for free and paid-for by revenues obtained in the other side of the market, notably via advertising. We may be among the few economic illiterates that haven’t devised a way to monetize at all our advertising and, instead, have traditionally advertised anything that friends do (plus the books and journals of which Nicolas gets a copy; e.g. see the post below this one). In that spirit:

On 26 September the Competition Law Scholars Forum (CLASF) will be holding its 23rd workshop in Madrid under the title  Competition Law in Leisure Markets. The program, which includes discussions on Google, ebooks, football and even bullfighting, is available here.

By the way, one of the organizers of this event –Prof. Barry Rodger- has just released a competition law textbook (co-written with Angus MacCulloch) titled “Competition Law and Policy in the EU and UK”. The book will be supported by the Who’s Competing blog. Here’s the flyer: Competition Law & Policy Flyer

On 30 September AntitrustItalia will be hosting a discussion on the Intel Judgment in Brussels featuring Manuel Kellerbauer and Luigi Malferrari, both from the Commission’s Legal Service. Click here for more info.

The university where I studied (which thanks to Prof. Jerónimo Maillo has always paid a great and uncommon attention to competition issues) will be holding an International Conference, also in Madrid, under the title “The Fight against Hard Core Cartels: Trends, Challenges and Best International Practices” on 27-28 November. The call for papers is available here: Call for PapersThe Fight Against Hard Core Cartels

Unfortunately I won’t be able to attend it because on 28 November I’ll be enjoying the warmness of Stockholm at the Swedish Competition Authority’s Pros and Cons Conference, which this time will be centered on Two-sided markets. The title of my presentation will be “The double duality of two-sided markets (on competition law and complexity)”. Now I only have to figure out what the heck to say.

Written by Alfonso Lamadrid

11 September 2014 at 12:14 pm

More on the antitrust-privacy interface

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In some previous posts we’ve commented on the interface between the competition rules and data protection/privacy regulation, which is one of the trendiest topics in international antitrust these days.

As you may recall, the European Data Protection Supervisor recently held a high level workshop (high level but for my intervention on it, that is) on Privacy, Competition, Consumers and Big Data. On Monday, the EDPS made available on its website a report summarizing what was discussed in the workshop (conducted under Chatham House rules). The EDPS’ summary is available here:  EDPS Report_Privacy, competition, consumers and big data.

A summary of my intervention at the workshop was published in two recent posts (here and here).

For more, you can re-read Orla Lynskey’s A Brave New World: The Potential Intersection of Competition Law and Data Protection Regulation as well as the interesting comment by Angela Daly on my latest post on the issue.

The German Monopolkommission has also addedd its voice to the debate by issuing a recent report (“A competitive order for the financial markets“) which contains a section on data-related questions regarding the internet economy. The Press Release (in English here) expressess some concerns but notes that, according to the report, “an extension of the competition policy toolkit does not (yet) seem advisable on the basis of current knowledge and understanding“.

Written by Alfonso Lamadrid

16 July 2014 at 9:33 am

Materials on commitment decisions + upcoming conferences (on Intel, Samsung and Motorola)

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Voluntary2

I realized yesterday that the slides used by all speakers at the Brussels School of Competition’s and Liège Competition and Innovation Institute’s very interesting conference on Commitment Decisions in EU Competition Policy are available here  (the image above corresponds to one of mines;  as an animated GIF it looked better in slidehow).

As for my presentation, I don’t think I said anything that was particularly original. I essentially did a 20 minutes quick overview and categorization of  the commitment decisions adopted so far on the bases of  (a) the (real) underlying reasons to resort to them, which may not always have to do with procedural economy considerations; (b) the sectors they affect (you can observe clear clusters that provide useful insights regarding enforcement priorities complementing regulatory initiatives -or lack thereof-); (c) the theories of harm at issue in each case and (d) the remedies made binding. This exercise made (even more) evident that both the theories of harm and the remedies that we see in these cases are nowhere to be found in Art. 7 infringement decisions. My purpose was merely to provide an objective account of these cases, so I left the discussion on the pros and cons of this approach to my fellow panelists.

Btw, the Liège Competition and Innovation Institute will also be holding other two interesting conferences in the coming days:

Intel v Commission: More eco or more ordo fiendly? next Monday 16 of June

and

The Commission’s Decisions in the Samsung and Motorola Cases – IP v. Competition 2.0?on 11 July

Have a nice w-e!

 

 

Written by Alfonso Lamadrid

13 June 2014 at 11:12 am

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